How To Extend The Reach And Life Of Your Status Update [part 1]

23 Dec

We have a constant stream of information coming at us. We have social network message streams from Twitter that speed by, Facebook  Google plus and other social networks that fight for our attention.

How do we influence people to pay attention to our message if our status update is show and then gets buried under everything else and it’s gone in the timeline buried under all the other messages? I’d like to show you a few ways you can extend the life and reach of your message while you also grow your network and influence.

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Let’s just look at 3 different social networks and what a typical reach might look like.

Facebook

reachout

Facebook has got a few ways to allow status updates to bubble up to the top of your stream.  They primarily are based on how many people like, comment or share what you post.  It seems to leave many updates left to the tiny “ticker” box on the upper right with real time updates.

There is an option to change your stream on the option that says, “Sort”,  from “Top Stories” or “Most Recent”.  I’m noticing lately that you will not even see some of the status updates from your friends if you don’t comment or interact with them much, which is one of the features I most dislike about Facebook.

Facebook is referred to as a “social network” where you can connect with those that are already friends in real life, past or present.  My best guess is that your status message has a life of about 2 hours before it’s buried below the rest of status updates if you have more than a few hundred friends, which is pretty typical.

 

Google plus

networked-worldGoogle plus has been referred to as an “interest network” based on connecting people on what they are interested in and this has been enhanced by their recent addition of “Communities“.  It’s a great network to not only keep in touch with those you know, but connect with and join discussions of those that have common interests and affiliations as you.

Google connects users by allowing #hashtags that help users engage in conversation based on a topic.  As an example if you search for #smallbusiness you will get results of users that have “tagged” their status update with that topic.

When on the Google+ mobile app you can tag your status update to a location as large as a city based geographical tag [geo-tag] or your location set to a business name.  The life estimate of Google plus about 2-3 hours or if #hashtags are used can extend to about 24-48 hours or more.  It’s much larger than Facebook because tags are commonly searched, and if someone searches for a tag your post can be discovered.

 

 

Twitter

Twitter has been explained as a micro-blog.  Blog is shortened from it’s original name “Web Log”
blog-definitionMeaning it’s like blog but limited to 140 characters.  As far as I know the #hashtag concept started on twitter.  You can find chat groups on twitter [if you want to know of good ones I interact with  just leave a comment] where at a specific time of day you can search for a #hashtag and users are in a real time conversation with each post tagged with #twitterchat or whatever the chosen tag is.

This is really incredible if you think about it because all these conversations are being archived within the twitter stream and can be searched later by any user.  If you find a chat group you might like you can search for the #hashtag they use and review the conversation and connect with people who have previously interacted in that chat.

Now that you have an understanding of what the reach of status updates are on the big 3 social networks, on the next post we’ll cover the practical application and how to get the most reach and life from your message as it applies to marketing, networking and making business connections.

[box]Continue to Part Two[/box]

Leave a comment to how you could get more value from expanding your network,

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